WSU Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center

Tree Fruit Market Diseases

Thursday, November 23, 2017

WSU-TFREC/Postharvest Information Network/Tree Fruit Market Diseases/lowo2



The symptoms of low-oxygen injury vary with the oxygen level, the length of unfavorable storage, the variety of apple, and perhaps the storage temperature. McIntosh at 38 °F in 1 percent oxygen and zero percent carbon dioxide for 6 months may show only surface indentations somewhat like bruises (top photo) or may be somewhat more damaged. McIntosh stored at 38° in zero percent oxygen and zero percent carbon dioxide for just 6 weeks were much more seriously affected than the lot above with 1 percent oxygen. Most of the surface skin appeared cooked (second photo) and the flesh was killed and pale brown half way or more to the core (third photo) giving a somewhat similar appearance to soggy breakdown. Apples seriously affected by low oxygen, however, have a strong, fermented odor. Jonathan apples held in zero percent oxygen and zero percent carbon dioxide, but at 32° for 6 months, developed similar symptoms, but in some instances the brown, dead tissues occurred in the core area (fourth photo). Delicious apples stored in a similar atmosphere at 32° for 6 months and then held in air at 70° for 6 days developed extensive irregular brown skin areas (fifth photo). Some appeared similar to soft scald, but they had a decidedly fermented odor and usually lacked the sharply outlined, ribbon-like patterns typical of soft scald.

Low oxygen injury, McIntosh
Low oxygen injury, McIntosh

Low oxygen injury, McIntosh
Low oxygen injury, McIntosh

Low oxygen injury, McIntosh
Low oxygen injury, McIntosh

Low oxygen injury, Jonathan
Low oxygen injury, Jonathan

Low oxygen injury, Delicious
Low oxygen injury, Delicious

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